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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 53  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 248-252

Correlation between clinical neuropathy scores and nerve conduction studies in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy


1 Department of Neurology, Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed M Abdelalim
Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, 11562
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-1083.202386

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Background Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) represents one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between clinical neuropathy scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). Patients and methods This study included 30 (12 men and 18 women) Egyptian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus complaining of symptoms suggestive of DPN. All patients underwent a clinical evaluation using three clinical scores: the Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS), the Neuropathy Impairment Score in the Lower Limbs (NIS-LLs), and the Diabetic Neuropathy Examination (DNE) score. Neurophysiological studies using NCS as well as measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) were carried out. Results HbA1C was significantly correlated with NDS, NIS-LL, and DNE. The NDS was statistically correlated to median nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity; ulnar nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction, motor amplitude, motor conduction velocity; and peroneal nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity, motor amplitude, and motor conduction velocity. NIS-LL was significantly correlated with median nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity; motor amplitude, motor conduction velocity; ulnar nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity, motor conduction velocity; and peroneal nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity, motor amplitude, and motor conduction velocity. DNE was significantly correlated with median nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity, motor amplitude, motor conduction velocity; ulnar nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity, motor amplitude, motor conduction velocity; and peroneal nerve sensory amplitude, sensory conduction velocity, motor amplitude, and motor conduction velocity. Conclusion Clinical neuropathy scores represent a simple tool for evaluation and follow-up of patients with DPN in comparison with NCS, and we recommend the use of these scores in clinical practice on a routine basis.


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